Blue
(Trois Couleurs: Bleu)



foreign films



Blue (Trois Couleurs: Bleu)
Made in: France
Language: French
Director: Krzysztof Kieslowski
Starring: Juliette Binoche, Benoît Règent
Year: 1993

Synopsis: Blue is the first of the Three Colors trilogy, directed by the late Krzysztof Kieslowski. The basic storyline of is simple, but the film is not.

The story is about Julie (Juliette Binoche), a young woman married to a famous French composer. After a sudden car accident, she wakes up in a hospital and discovers that her husband and only daughter have both been killed.

The rest of the movie follows Julie and the way in which she deals with the tragedy. As she discovers secrets about her late husband, Julie attempts to isolate herself from anything that might remind her of her loss.

But can she go on simply existing in loneliness, or will she eventually have to reconnect with the world around her and learn to embrace life again?



My recommendation: Kieslowski's Blue is for you if you're interested in foreign films, and want to make a conscious effort to dive into this area of cinema.

Having gained a lot of notoriety and having been nominated for (and won) a load of prestigious awards, this film has been analyzed, written about, and drooled over by critics, scholars, professors, writers, and other various smart people.

I'm not saying you're guaranteed to like it, but I do recommend that you give it a try.

First off, let me say that Blue, which has garnered so much attention after its release, will seem intimidating. You'll find (or perhaps already heard and/or read) a lot of lengthy analyses and interpretations that make reference to the protagonist's "inner turmoil" or you might have come across mention of certain camera angles or shots that are supposed to be deeply symbolic or philosophical.

This, after all, was considered a very important film among cinema scholars and in Kieslowski's career.

That being said, don't feel pressured to get the same thing out of this movie that the above-mentioned smart people did. Although their analyses and critiques of Kieslowski's films are not entirely without merit, reading too much about them will take the enjoyment out of your viewing experience.

Furthermore, having worked in academia, I know there's a lot of pressure for those scholars and critics to sound intelligent.

Watch this foreign film and evaluate it through your own eyes. You are also a film-watcher, and your honest impressions and opinions are valuable too, even if you aren't an egghead.

If you like it, great. If not, that's okay too.

I'm recommending this film mainly because Kieslowski was a fellow who loved his craft. He doesn't jerk his audience around.

And most important, he hopes that we, the viewers, get something meaningful out of his work.

Blue is followed by two more films: White and Red. (in that order).

Review written by: Joe Yang



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